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The shimmering façade of liberty

In the twilight of a kingdom, the coronation of King Charles, a stage set to display the shimmering façade of liberty, while the UK government hastens its grip on the throat of protests

In the twilight of a kingdom, the coronation of King Charles, a stage set to display the shimmering façade of liberty, whispers the cabinet minister, while the UK government hastens its grip on the throat of protests. Tugendhat, the security minister, stands firm, defending the tightening noose of laws: a year behind bars for those daring to block roads, half a year or endless fines for those who lock onto others, objects, or structures. The police, poised to halt and scrutinise those suspected of sowing the seeds of “disruption.” Amidst the shadows, the looming presence of official warnings, sent to the anti-monarchists, planning their peaceful dissent. Yet, the cabinet minister insists, the “liberty to protest” remains.

A shadow descends on the land, an iron fist grips tighter. The UK government, frantic, hastens legislation to choke dissent, to silence the masses. Anti-monarchists, planning peaceful protests, stare into the cold gaze of official warning letters, the government’s frantic scrawling revealing the hurried passage of new criminal offenses, a smokescreen to stifle the chaos of disruption.

Dark whispers, a coercive force, the Home Office’s Police Powers Unit, brandishing tactics branded as “intimidatory” by lawyers, infiltrates the campaign group Republic. New powers, shrouded in deceit, promise to crush disruption at major sporting and cultural events. Approved by the hand of Charles, the law doth decree: protesters blocking roads, airports, railways, shall face the cold embrace of prison walls for a year; those locking onto others, objects, or buildings, shall taste six months’ confinement and the cruelty of unlimited fines. The police, hungry wolves, prowl the streets, sniffing out potential (victims) chaos among the masses.

Approved by the hand of Charles, the law doth decree: protesters blocking roads, airports, railways, shall face the cold embrace of prison walls for a year; those locking onto others, objects, or buildings, shall taste six months’ confinement and the cruelty of unlimited fines

The Home Office, sweating desperation, insists the timing of these laws is mere coincidence, but lawyers and Republic sense intimidation, the stench of fear, in the days leading to planned demonstrations in central London. Graham Smith, chief executive of Republic, recoils from the oddness of the letter, seeking assurances from the police that their protest plans remain untouched. But the heavy hand of the Home Office crushes the throat of freedom of speech advocates, a relentless force intent on suppressing peaceful and legitimate protests.

But the heavy hand of the Home Office crushes the throat of freedom of speech advocates, a relentless force intent on suppressing peaceful and legitimate protests.

The coronation, a canvas for the United Kingdom’s supposed liberty and democracy, Tugendhat speaks on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, claiming security as a liberator, not a suppressor, as in the suffocating grasp of authoritarian states. The anti-monarchists, granted the liberty to protest, but denied the freedom to disturb others, the line drawn in the sand. The minister, elusive when pressed on the parameters of “non-disruptive protest,” wary of those seeking loopholes, speaks of the intricate dance of police and intelligence, weaving the tapestry of security. The security operation, a gilded spectacle, Operation Golden Orb, the orb, the all seeing eye, sees thousands of officers summoned from the far reaches of the kingdom, cloaked in plain attire, their eyes scanning from rooftops, guarding the path to Westminster Abbey. Pride swells in Tugendhat’s chest, the swift response to the man hurling “shotgun cartridges” into the grounds of Buckingham Palace.

The security operation, a gilded spectacle, Operation Golden Orb, the orb, the all seeing eye, sees thousands of officers summoned from the far reaches of the kingdom, cloaked in plain attire, their eyes scanning from rooftops, guarding the path to Westminster Abbey.


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